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http://6th-sense.net/index.php/conspiracy-articles/72-mars-hoax-the-footage-of-mars-is-taken-on-earth

 

There is an increasing number of people who believe that NASA’s rovers never left the Earth in the first place, and the pictures they are allegedly sending back from Mars are taken in remote areas of our planet.

But if NASA’s rovers are not on Mars, then where exactly are they?

First of all, evidence suggests that the pictures that we see on NASA’s website are not even taken by the Curiosity and Opportunity rovers.

It is very possible that by now, both rovers are stored in a hangar, somewhere at NASA’s JPL headquarters, and have been replaced by their smaller and more practical baby brothers.

Sure, if needed, they can always be taken out for a spin, but other than that, the smaller rovers are more convenient to work with.

One of the known locations where NASA is playing around with these small rovers is Devon Island, Canada.

(It’s worth noting that Devon Island is “the largest uninhabited island on Earth,” which seems like a pretty good location for a fake Martian photo shoot).

 

 

NASA base in Devon Island, Canada — even without the color filters,

it’s strikingly similar to Mars, isn’t it?

We have been tricked into believing the myth that Mars is the “red planet” (even though all amateur telescope pictures show otherwise).

As you can clearly see for yourself, Mars is not red,  It’s light and dark brown, similar to what Earth would look like without all the water and vegetation.

The following is an image compilation from Antonio Cidadao (1999):

 

 

NASA admitted on numerous occasions to alter the colors of their pictures before posting them online, so that they look more like what we would see, if we were on Mars.

 

Here’s something straight from NASA’s website:

 

“Getting the colors right is not an exact science,” says Bell. “Giving an approximate view of what we’d see if we were there involves an artistic, visionary element as well – after all, no one’s ever been there before.” However, great pains are taken to be as accurate as possible, short of going there ourselves.

To give people a sense of being on Mars, scientists combine views through telescopes, data from past Mars missions, and new information from the current mission to create a color-balanced, uniform scene. Color-corrected mosaics simulate the view a person would see if all the images in the mosaic were taken on the same day, at the same moment. 

In addition, the rovers can take three pictures in a row of the same surface area on Mars using three different primary color filters – red, green, and blue – to make one color image. “It works a little like an inkjet color printer, which combines primary colors to create various shades on paper,” explains Eric De Jong, Lead for the Solar System Visualization Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “Then, we can tweak the color just like you can adjust the color balance on a TV screen at home.”

– NASA, JPL

 

 

“Martian” anomalies

 

Taking all of the above into consideration, it is now easier to understand why enthusiasts find so many inconsistencies and anomalies in NASA’s pictures. Let’s take the following picture for example:

 

 

 

The media called it the “Mars rat”, but this is actually an arctic lemming and it is commonly found on — you’ve guessed it — Devon Island.

Here is a picture of the arctic lemming, taken on Devon Island:

 

 

 

(This picture is taken in an area with vegetation, but as you can see in the first two pictures of this article, there are plenty of barren landscapes on Devon Island).

NASA’s technique of coloring the whole ground so to make it look like Mars (as you will see), made the small creature look like a rock — until someone with a sharp eye spotted it.

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